The BITES Challenge

Wondering who came up with the idea that counting bites would be useful for weight loss?

You probably suspect it was the 80Bites duo, Meredith Luce, RD, MS, LN, and Joan Breibart, but actually Dr. Richard G. Black, a Seattle physician, devised the first bite counting system. His program, “Count Bites, Not Calories.” was published in Family Circle in 1977. Unfortunately, neither Luce, Breibart nor most of America read the article so the bites plan didn’t get any further attention. Meanwhile, every year thereafter, new “miracle” diets came about in the media, each with some weird nutrient or food manipulation promising to melt away the fat.

Finally, ten years later, SELF Magazine publishes our system in “The No-Diet Diet,” written by Candace Bushnell, of Sex & the City fame. And what was the reaction of the public, the press and the diet professionals? The same as it was 10 years earlier. They didn’t bite—pun intended. No one was interested.

Then, in 2004, with obesity being a daily news item, the New York Post publishes our bite program in, “The Bite Stuff—Chew Story.” This time professionals voiced their disagreement with loud and public criticism. Why? Our “failure” to back the accepted dogma: eight glasses of water daily; low-fat eating; and “fat burning” exercise.

What Have We Learned

Twenty seven years later, we know that the 1955 “Water” Directive should have read Fluids– not Water alone! The 70s campaign to vilify fat only encouraged sugar binging. As for exercise, the simplistic calories in calories out is a nice equation, but “fat burning” exercise is really just a good marketing ploy.

While the concept of bites is gaining support—there are even copycats with bite counting gadgets– there is still disbelief because counting bites does not equate with calories ingested. (Even Dr. Black tried to equate bites with caloric intake.) What we are beginning to recognize is that you cannot overload the body. Too much quantity will stretch the stomach and cause a critical digestive hormone to malfunction. The result is leptin resistance—the reason why almost everyone in America is hungry most of the time.

Today we understand that carbo-hydrate, protein and fat calories are absorbed differently by the body. Theoretically, where you get your calories does make a difference, but more importantly, how much and how often are the significant and controllable measures. By starting the process of stimulating your stomach less often and with less quantity, you begin to re-train your weight at the digestive level. Learning how to eat less and drink less, less often, is simplified by using the 80Bites App counting method. The more you use it, the easier it becomes; the less you need to use it, the sooner your stomach takes over and the process becomes so natural that you will be saying, “Thanks, but I can’t eat another bite!”